Cosplay for fun and profit

Halloween has come and past. For many people that is an opportunity to dress up as a favorite ghoul, superhero, tv personality, etc.

For those with interests in sci-fi and anime and are convention attendees, it’s another opportunity (among many) to dress up as a favorite character. So, I did.

Work had a Halloween costume contest. Prizes were involved. I asked my boss: “Does this mean I can come to work dressed up as a magical girl?” His response was an emphatic “YES!”

So, of course, I did. I wore my “Man-doka” cosplay that I have worn to conventions this past year.

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 I will tell you…doing receiving in this outfit is no easy task…the heels are a killer after a couple of hours.

A bunch of my co-workers and friends already know about this cosplay I do, but to see it in person was a blast for many of them. Co-workers who I am not friends with on social media, and didn’t know I dressed up like this for cons, were taken aback and quite amused. It made a lot of people happy.

After a week or so, I found out that I did win the contest. That was awesome. Beyond the contest it got me thinking about cosplay and why I do it (to the limited degree I do), and the benefits of cosplay.

When I started going to cons, I was a newbie. I went for a day, then two days, then the whole weekend. Then I looked at cosplay and thought to myself: “why not?” It was another way to connect and immerse myself in an experience. At first, I did a few that were more “normal” for me to do. Older males, etc.
After a time I got to thinking, Puella Magi Madoka Magica is one of my favorite shows…Maybe I should cosplay something from that.

The idea amused me…for a couple of reasons. I make a horrible looking magical girl and it would embarrass my boys being the primary ones. I played around with the idea, pitched it to a couple of friends, and finally bit the bullet. My first magical girl cosplay was Mami Tomoe, I called my version “Manny Tomoe” and I spoke in a gravelly faux East coast (USA) accent. It was a lot of fun. After that, I did Madoka Kaname, or “Man-doka” where I walked around talking like a version of The Tick. Loud, confident, and superhero-ish.

Do I feel loud, confident, and superhero-ish? Absolutely not. I have to psych myself up to dress like this. It’s takes me summoning a combination of courage and an attitude of not giving a fuck. And then off I go. I’m happy I do it. If for no other reason than this:

It makes (some) people happy. People smile. Get excited. Want to take a picture. It brightens someones day just a little. A lot of people outside the con-going community might not understand this. For some people, Halloween is the only socially acceptable time to dress up in a costume, and that’s too bad. I think sometimes, as adults, we forget the power of play. Of simple ridiculous fun.

I’m not a good cosplayer. There are many who are absolutely awesome. They make amazing outfits. They are artists. I have a great respect for that. There are people who just want to dress up to represent their favorite shows, video game, movie, character, etc. This is also awesome. It connects and bonds you to others who share your interests. There are people like myself who like a show, and just like making people smile a little. And all of us are out there to forget about life for a little while.

That’s why I like to dress up on days beyond Halloween. That’s why I love the cosplayers, each doing their own unique thing. And that is why I will keep doing it. Beyond work prizes, I made some people smile and brightened their day in a small and silly way.

 

Until Next time: Happy Viewing!

 

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A Word About Goblins

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Goblin Slayer

  I decided to write a brief post that will mostly be a “duh” to many anime viewers.

I am three episodes in. I don’t really have a deep opinion on the show…it’s kind of what it is: A lot of Goblin slaying.

I had heard some buzz around it before the season started, but knew nothing about it really. When the first episode came out I asked my 14 year old if he wanted to watch it.

We sat down and gave it a look. My son’s reaction by the end of the episode: “Well, that just happened! Damn…I was not expecting all of that!”

Neither was I. I wasn’t upset or anything. I just was not expecting what went down.

After I got that the content of the show was going to be on the explicit side of the spectrum, I watched some more. Is it a good show? I don’t know. Kind of a standard adventurer, Lord of the Rings-esque, DnD like sort of fantasy. I will see where it goes. I neither love, nor hate the show at this point.

However to my main purpose: parents….this isn’t an innocent show. It’s not SAO. It’s a sometimes brutal and fan-service-y show.

Attention Parents: There is gore, brutal killings, rape, some nudity, and fan service in this show. Keep this in mind when your kids ask about this one.

I will probably keep watching it to see where it goes.

Until Next Time: Happy Viewing!

 

Everyone Needs a Darling

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Darling in the Franxx

The Jian, also known as “the bird that shares wings,” only possesses one wing. Unless a male and female pair lean on each other and act as one, they’re incapable of flight. They’re imperfect, incomplete creatures.

But, for some reason, their way of life, struck me as profoundly beautiful. It was beautiful, I felt.”- Hiro

Darling in Franxx was a favorite of mine this year, but it didn’t start that way exactly. I had heard about this collaboration between A-1 (now Cloverworks) and Trigger several months before the release and was excited to see what this would yield.

I won’t go into me writing a synopsis of the show, so here’s a link to Wikipedia:

Darling in Franxx

At first, I liked the concept, the art, the basic feel of the show. However, after the first six or so episodes, I was feeling very unsure where the series was going to go. I felt like the store kind of floundered a bit.

Where it turned around for me was after that. When they start to explore the dynamic between the main group of kids the show follows. I know this runs contrary to many other people’s feeling on the show, but that’s where it kicked in for me.

The reason it set in for me I guess, was the themes of belonging and connectedness that underlie the show. From Zero-Two’s attempt to connect to Hiro and the group, the brief marriage, to the group’s sense of self sufficiency and belonging. They were normal needs that young teens were left to negotiate in the absence of real adult guidance.

As the show progresses you find out more about Zero-Two and Hiro’s past and more about the battle that they are fighting with the Klaxosaurs. The pacing steps up and becomes better than the slower muddled pace (for me) than the beginning. Some episodes being handled really well with the sense of excitement and suspense. My younger son and I got really into speculating what was going to happen next.

The ending was a little protracted, but I definitely like it. Especially the final scene.

 

 

Would I recommend this show? Yes. I liked it. The story, while a little oddly paced at times, is enjoyable (and another variation on the Red and Blue Oni story) and has some nice emotional moments.

The animation is good and you can see the influence from both studios at times.

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The cross is very Studio Trigger!

The OP was great. Enough said.

 

Attention Parents: There is some mild violence, mostly of a cartoon nature. There are themes of adolescent sexuality (I mean… the whole Franxx piloting system is sexualized).

Despite some of the criticism out there for the show, I liked it and was a favorite of mine this year if for nothing else, but because I like the romantic notion of everyone having their “darling”.

Adaptations: Yay or Nay?

  Full Metal Alchemist and  Gintama 

(The live action movies)

Recently I have had the pleasure, and displeasure, of seeing a couple of live action adaptations of beloved anime.

Now I am a fan of anime, and animation in general. I like seeing the art and the skill in which the animated story is expressed. That being said, I approached these two adaptations with a bit of caution. I wasn’t really sure they could pull it off.

Full Metal Alchemist

I’m sorry if you liked this adaption, but in my mind they really didn’t pull it off. It was kind of a train wreck. For several reasons.

  • The story was a mess. It was very convoluted. If you were not familiar with the original you would probably be scratching your head at what was happening. This, in many ways, is understandable as they were trying to cram an entire season into a two hour movie. Now what they actually did was use much of the first season and a modified piece of the end. It really didn’t work well.
  • The characters. They had a bunch of them, but because of how they were written and the direction you never really got to care about any of them. FMA Brotherhood is known for some great, heart-wrenching scenes…but it depended on caring about these characters and giving them the time to develop that made the difference that just didn’t happen in this movie.
  • Th direction. It wasn’t good and the director didn’t seem to have watched the original. There are scenes that should be dark, lit for impact and mood, but that was very much missed in this movie. Taking hugely important scenes from the original anime and directing them in such a way that they took on much less significance.

    It’s hard to tell from the movie still here, but it was a bright, sunny day in the live movie and not lit or directed for the emotional impact needed.

  • The music. The opening scene music felt way out of place. I know I’m being picky, but it was the first thing I noticed.
  • Costuming and CGI. Some people have likened Ed’s actor as looking more like an excited cosplayer. That’s a little mean, but the hair does look a bit out of place. Some of the the CGI worked fine, but I think they could have utilized it better How about Ed petting/ comforting Nina-doggo?
  • The casting. I actually was okay with the casting. Ed wasn’t great, but not bad. I thought Lust and Envy were decent and the choice for Maes Hughes was good.
  • Nerdy fan stuff. No Scar, Teacher, Hohenheim, Pride, Wrath, Greed, or Sloth. No explanation of the impotance of the Ishvalen war. No explanation of the humunculi. Winry was not used well in the movie at all. Aaand Lieutenant Ross’s character was introduced by serving tea and sandwiches….so not cool.

Take a look at it, it’s currently available on Netflix. See if you like it…you may? I definitely had issues with the movie and thought it was a poor adaptation.

Gintama

I saw this one in the the theater. I overall liked it. As an adaption I thought they did a good job. This, I actually recommend seeing.

  • The story. It was good. Followed the show pretty well and was a cohesive enough of a story that you wouldn’t feel lost not knowing the source material. It was touted as a retelling of the Benizakura Arc and did a pretty good job.
  • The comedy. This was one of the movie’s weaker points, in my opinion. There were times when the actors were really trying to emulate the anime/ manga comedy faces, etc that kind of fell flat for me. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it felt forced. There were some bits of self aware comedy that were quite funny as the movie poked fun at itself or made reference to other anime.
  • CGI and costuming. I wish they had more budget for this. Some of the Amanto looked kind of hokey and some of the CGI could have been done better. But, time, budget, etc all falls into this…so I kind of just accepted that going in.
  • The casting. I thought the casting was amazing. Everyone were really good choices. I loved the choices for the Shinsengumi!
  • The action. Great fight scenes. Nice visuals. a high point.
  • Dramatic moments. It wouldn’t be Gintama if there wasn’t some dramatic monologue thrown in somewhere among the silliness. The movie did this and did it well I thought.

 

I would recommend seeing this one. Will you like it? Perhaps? I would think so…at least more than Full Metal Alchemist…

Until next time: Happy viewing!!

Bullying, Suicide, and “A Silent Voice”

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A Silent Voice

 I got to see this movie last night in the theater with my two teen boys last night. It was powerful. I highly recommend it not only for it’s beautiful animation, but for it’s story that was often sweet, infuriating, and sad.

The story opens with a teenage boy, Shōya Ishida, on a bridge contemplating suicide. He then goes into the memories that got him to that place.

During elementary school, he bullied a girl (Shōko Nishimiya) who happened to be deaf who was new to his class. Shōko soon became an outcast in her class with the other students following suit, however Shōya was the main bully. Shōko tried hard to befriend Shōya and others despite her treatment, but was rebuffed for her efforts with the bullying intensifying. Things finally come to a head when Shōya rips out Shōko’s hearing aids (not the first time) and causes Shōko’s ear to bleed.

Shōko doesn’t come to school the next day. The principal, upon hearing about the incident from Shōko’s mother, confronts the class and demands to know who was responsible for Shōko’s bullying. The homeroom teacher calls out Shōya for his behavior and the rest of his classmates lets the sole blame rest on Shōya. Shōya protests insisting that it wasn’t just him, but several of his friends and classmates as well. Shōko transfers to another school and, because of his act of sharing the blame, Shōya becomes the subject of the bullying. He is outcast, bullied and shunned by his friends and classmates.

By the time we return to the present we find Shōya as a loner. He is filled with shame and guilt for his behavior in his treatment of  Shōko and anxiety about others due to his own bullying. He is socially isolated and suicidal.

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 In a last act of penance Shōya seeks out Shōko, these many years later, to apologize to her before finally committing suicide. In the years since he has seen her, he had learned sign language so he could communicate this to her. When he finally meets her instead of apologizing to make it an end for himself,  he (on impulse) asks her to be his friend.

And so the new story begins. I won’t go into it all. There is hope. New friendships. Sadness. Old wounds. Sadness. Guilt. And pain.

It is a very powerful story. It reminds us of something that I feel sometimes that gets forgotten: what we say and do matter. We impact one another. So often it becomes easy to depersonalize another when online because we don’t see a real person in front of us feeling real pain. On top of this, we can carry this desensitization out in to the real world.

Attention Parents: This is a movie with challenging themes. Watch it anyways. Watch it with your kids. Have conversations with them around the subjects of suicide and bullying.

Please watch this movie when you get the chance. Besides the story, it really is beautifully animated.

 

 

Until next time: Happy viewing.

And if you are going through a hard time…please don’t do anything to hurt yourself. It will get better even if you don’t believe it right now…trust me…People love you. Okay?

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

1-800-273-8255

 

For Deaf & Hard of Hearing

Now what is a “Gal” exactly???

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 Hajimete no Gal

(My First Girlfriend Is a Gal)

 

I can’t really remembered what prompted me to watch this show. I am, in general, not a big consumer of the “ecchi” humor styles of shows (despite the Monotogari series being on of my favorites), but I watched nonetheless. Usually a friend of mine watches these more often and I think I figured: “What the hell, I’ll see if I like it and tell him if I think it’s any good. And I came away liking it more than I thought I would, which surprised me.

“Gal” (Gyaru)seems to be a Japanese pop culture term that reflecting a certain fashion aesthetic. Dark tans, bleached or dyed hair, lots of make up, fancy nails, and non-traditional fashion. The (Gyraru) term seems to have originated out of a 1970s brand of jeans. However, while being a term for a fashion subculture, meanings have a way of changing and being warped depending on the observer. “Gal”, while referring to a general way of dress, has also taken on (at least in this show) to imply that the wearer has looser morals than other girls.

And we come to the show’s premise: A “loser” type of guy ( Junichi) ends up dating a “Gal” (Yukana). Junichi actually asks Yukana out after his friends set him up by putting a note in Yukana’s locker to meet him after school on his behalf. In the thought that Junichi might not remain a virgin if he dates a girl like Yukana, he asks her out. She accepts.

And that’s where the show starts out. It is ecchi…there are boobs…lots of un-naturally chesty high schoolers.

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These are definitely on the ridiculous side.

The overall story follows the development of Junichi and Yukana’s relationship. It is going from the surface to something deeper. What Junichi finds, and I am happy that he does, is that Yukana is a person. Someone with greater depth and kindness who is actually a bit conservative with her affections (despite teasing him every so often). Yukana is very self possessed and isn’t going to even kiss someone who isn’t serious about her.

So what we get with this show is somewhat less ecchi comedy, but more of a high school rom-com. There are the ecchi elements that are to be exploited to be sure, but I felt the point of the anime ended up the development of a more mature relationship between the two protagonists.

This does lead to some confusion I guess…What did this show want to be? An ecchi comedy, fan-service-a-thon, a harem, a rom-com? It kind of attempted to be all things and so never became as good as it could have been I suppose.

The big issue I have with this show was oddly not the ecchi fan service….

It was with this fucker.

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While Junichi’s friends were kind of annoying, this character was repulsive. He likes little girls…he is very vocal about how he likes little girls…the joke is that he’s a future sex offender. That shit isn’t funny. Normalizing pedophiles is not funny or good. Sure, everyone around him in the show comments that he’s not right, but he’s there to be some bit of comedy. It’s not funny.

Attention Parents: This show is ecchi. Heavy fan service. Lots of skin (although no nudity). There are many sexual jokes. There is also a sex predator. You have been warned: do as you will.

This show wasn’t spectacular, and not my usual style of show to watch, but despite this I still enjoyed it. I liked seeing the development of a real relationship between Junichi and Yukana and seeing Junichi’s vision of Yukana evolve over time. The fan service is just kind of there…the supporting characters are just kind of there…the art is decent. It was the relationship for me. Give it a look.

Until next time: Happy viewing!

 

I Watched It…Enjoyed It…But Something Bothered Me…

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Akashic Records of Bastard Magic Instructor

 

First off, let me get this out of the way:

I enjoyed this show. The animation was decent. The story, while not mind-blowingly original or particularly innovative, was still enjoyable enough to watch. The characters were also pretty cliche for the most part.

Yet…I enjoyed watching it. Was it a favorite? Absolutely not. I will probably forget about it in time as it’s not particularly memorable. But I don’t regret watching it.

I’m not even going to go into detail telling you about the show, but if you don’t know about it already here’s a link to get you up to speed:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akashic_Records_of_Bastard_Magic_Instructor

 

But some things about the show did get under my skin a little bit….

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 THE GIRL’S SCHOOL UNIFORMS!!! Ye gods it bugged the hell out of me! Yes, yes, I know it’s fan service, but they are so ridiculously pandering I just found it horribly distracting how stupid they were! I know this is some immature male fantasy image that is found in anime/ manga/ American comics/ video games, but can’t they try a little harder to make a good story rather than going cynically for the fan service?

Here are the boy students in contrast:

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 I couldn’t find many images, but trust me: The male students are not wearing crop tops and booty shorts!

And please for the love of all that is holy, would someone explain to me…

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…Why Sistine has “neko” ears???? No one else does! No other student. Not her parents. Unless I am totally forgetting something or someone, it’s only her. This seems to be a very cynical ploy to sell a main character by making her extra cute with her cat ears or something,  but perhaps I am judging this too harshly.

Attention Parents: There is fan service in this show. There is the obligatory beach episode. Standard boob jokes. Person walking in on a group of girls changing scene. Sexual innuendo is present some as well. You have been warned.

Attention potential viewer: It’s not a horrible show, but it tries to make up for it’s lack of originality with rather blatant fan service. It’s not the first show to do this (of course), and it’s definitely not going to be the last.

Watch it…or not…it’s okay, but it’s a way to kill some time.

Until next time: Happy Viewing!

Awkward Sweetness

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Tsuki ga Kirei

This a good, low key, sweet show. I enjoyed it quite a bit, not for it’s action or intensity, but for it’s genuine, quiet, awkward sweetness.

It follows the budding relationship Kotaro and Akane, two students in their final year of junior high school. Kotaro is a bookish aspiring author and Akane is an accomplished runner in her track and field club. Despite running in different circles, they develop a friendship and eventually start dating.

The show really plays on the awkwardness and embarrassment of a first love as well as what it is to be at a very self conscious age. The supporting characters are also nicely included and the messiness of relationships and misunderstanding get a nice treatment as well.

The animation was enjoyable for me and I liked the OP.

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I’d like to include the OP….I just couldn’t find it. 😦

Attention Parents: This is a sweet show. There is no fan service, curing, or violence to speak of. Will younger kids be entertained??? Maybe, maybe not. It’s a slow paced, quiet show.

I really like the show. Give it a watch if you like a sweeter, quiet style of show….the ending made me tear up…I’m such a softie.

Until next time: Happy Viewing!!

 

*images on this post are not owned by me*

Change is Inevitable

First off: Hello! I have been off of here for a while. Not avoiding my blog per se, but resisting writing by a combination of prolonged procrastination and distracting myself with other things ( The weather has finally been nice in Wisconsin). I will try to start writing more again because I do feel a little better when I do.

I got to thinking about parenting and anime again recently…a big surprise given the content of my blog.
What got me thinking was how I have been letting my younger son watch a few things that I previously had kept him away from. This is only makes sense as he gets older though.

As kids get older, they mature (hopefully), they are able to take in new information, and react to it in a more thoughtful way. Parenting is not static, your approach and how you view your child needs to evolve over time.

With some shows, I have just allowed it. Other shows, I still restrict. And some I will watch with him, so as to discuss the content of what he watched to monitor how he is reacting to the more controversial parts of a show.

The series that got me thinking about this was the Monogatari series. I love this series (as many of you may know already). He’s been bugging me for a long time to watch it and I have always responded with a resounding : “Nooooo”.

At some point I changed my mind. Why? I have no idea.

Araragi is a bit of a cretin…

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He creeps on Hachikuji…

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And then there’s Kanbaru…

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So there are many reasons as a parent to have reservations. However, I realize he is getting older and stuff he discusses with his peers are just as awful.

But the thing that made me have the most reservations was in Nisemonogatari…You know what it is…everyone knows…the toothbrush scene. I don’t even like this scene. It’s creepy. It’s the thing I dislike about the series the most. Nisemonogatari is my least favorite of the series, but it does have some great conversations and exposition that becomes important later.

So…I have been watching the series with him. He saw the toothbrush scene…How did he react? With extreme discomfort. Good. He should. He said it was one of the most uncomfortable things he’s watched. I’m happy he felt that way rather than complacent.

I think that is a side benefit of being a fan of anime (and this can apply to other media as well) when your kids watch it. It opens the floor for discussion. A myriad of issues can be discussed that may not have come up otherwise. I can talk with him and express my view that Araragi is a creepy dude in many ways, I can steer him to think about these things, and I see what he is thinking.

Now that being said, the Monogatari series really is great in many other ways. It is a dialog heavy show with rapid fire wit and discourse, which is why I love it so and wanted to share it.

Sometimes you take the good with the bad, but opening a dialog helps frame the bad in a new context.

Watch anime.

Watch anime with your kids.

Watch and discuss anime with your kids.

These are just some thought that crossed my mind of late.

Until next time: Happy viewing!