Cosplay for fun and profit

Halloween has come and past. For many people that is an opportunity to dress up as a favorite ghoul, superhero, tv personality, etc.

For those with interests in sci-fi and anime and are convention attendees, it’s another opportunity (among many) to dress up as a favorite character. So, I did.

Work had a Halloween costume contest. Prizes were involved. I asked my boss: “Does this mean I can come to work dressed up as a magical girl?” His response was an emphatic “YES!”

So, of course, I did. I wore my “Man-doka” cosplay that I have worn to conventions this past year.

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 I will tell you…doing receiving in this outfit is no easy task…the heels are a killer after a couple of hours.

A bunch of my co-workers and friends already know about this cosplay I do, but to see it in person was a blast for many of them. Co-workers who I am not friends with on social media, and didn’t know I dressed up like this for cons, were taken aback and quite amused. It made a lot of people happy.

After a week or so, I found out that I did win the contest. That was awesome. Beyond the contest it got me thinking about cosplay and why I do it (to the limited degree I do), and the benefits of cosplay.

When I started going to cons, I was a newbie. I went for a day, then two days, then the whole weekend. Then I looked at cosplay and thought to myself: “why not?” It was another way to connect and immerse myself in an experience. At first, I did a few that were more “normal” for me to do. Older males, etc.
After a time I got to thinking, Puella Magi Madoka Magica is one of my favorite shows…Maybe I should cosplay something from that.

The idea amused me…for a couple of reasons. I make a horrible looking magical girl and it would embarrass my boys being the primary ones. I played around with the idea, pitched it to a couple of friends, and finally bit the bullet. My first magical girl cosplay was Mami Tomoe, I called my version “Manny Tomoe” and I spoke in a gravelly faux East coast (USA) accent. It was a lot of fun. After that, I did Madoka Kaname, or “Man-doka” where I walked around talking like a version of The Tick. Loud, confident, and superhero-ish.

Do I feel loud, confident, and superhero-ish? Absolutely not. I have to psych myself up to dress like this. It’s takes me summoning a combination of courage and an attitude of not giving a fuck. And then off I go. I’m happy I do it. If for no other reason than this:

It makes (some) people happy. People smile. Get excited. Want to take a picture. It brightens someones day just a little. A lot of people outside the con-going community might not understand this. For some people, Halloween is the only socially acceptable time to dress up in a costume, and that’s too bad. I think sometimes, as adults, we forget the power of play. Of simple ridiculous fun.

I’m not a good cosplayer. There are many who are absolutely awesome. They make amazing outfits. They are artists. I have a great respect for that. There are people who just want to dress up to represent their favorite shows, video game, movie, character, etc. This is also awesome. It connects and bonds you to others who share your interests. There are people like myself who like a show, and just like making people smile a little. And all of us are out there to forget about life for a little while.

That’s why I like to dress up on days beyond Halloween. That’s why I love the cosplayers, each doing their own unique thing. And that is why I will keep doing it. Beyond work prizes, I made some people smile and brightened their day in a small and silly way.

 

Until Next time: Happy Viewing!

 

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Don’t Leave Dad Alone With Your Stuff…

when you go to the bathroom at the Anime Convention…

Otherwise you get…

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Dad-Maru-chan!!!!

 

(I realize, I look a little crazed…it had been a long weekend)

On The Importance of Conventions

This subject has been in the back of my mind for a while now. I originally started this draft as just a title over a year ago, but here it is again, ever present in my thinking. And that is on the importance of conventions.

We (my two boys, their cousin, and best friend) just attended our first (of 3) anime conventions this year, Anime Milwaukee, a month ago.

There are all the regular trappings of conventions: the merch room, artist alley, video and tabletop gaming, guest panels, and cosplayers. These things alone set it up for an interesting weekend to be sure…but I perceive there to be a greater impact.

I was reminded of this during the “LGBTQ+& Anime Cultures” panel. I attended this panel out of curiosity and as a dad of a gay teen I sometimes feel it important (for me) to get a deeper perspective into things that affect his world. It was presented by the Milwaukee LGBT Community Center. It was a good panel. But one of the most things I walked away from the panel was the message of inclusion and having a safe space where individuals, no matter how they identify, feel like they can be themselves.

(Visit their site and support them or organizations like them in your community. http://www.mkelgbt.org/ )

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 I made sure to thank them afterwords. As a dad it makes a great impression and means a lot to me. While my son has a supportive family and group of great friends, not all people do and many struggle with being accepted and loved by those around them. Panels like these are important and I appreciate them.

 It’s not the only place I have heard messages like this at a Con. Anime Midwest is the first place I encountered this. Voice actor and D.J., Greg Ayres has been doing his “It Gets Better- Con Edition” panel there (and at other Cons) for the past several years. Greg’s panels include much of the same message, but is expansive beyond the LGBTQ community, but to those who are different (in the many ways we can be). But the overarching message is to be good to one another, be accepting, one of inclusion.

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(Go see this panel and say hi to Greg!)

 And as I walked through Anime Milwaukee I reflected on this. I saw all spectrum’s of race, gender, sexuality, size, and age. I saw all levels of fandom, from casual to hardcore. Anime otakus and gamers. People had a place to unite.

 A community.

 It gives me hope.

 In a time when there is increasing division and the politics of hate is prevalent. Where cynical politicians and intolerant, angry people are trying to legitimize racism, sexism, and homophobia, there is something else.

 The Importance of a Convention.

 It is there to help you realize, not all people are like that. That you can have a diverse community. That you can, and should, celebrate and love those around you. That we are better than the hatred that streams through our media filters daily.

 Conventions give me hope…and I love that!!!

 Go to a con near you and get some hope. See something new. Celebrate that there are people different than you and know that this is okay.

 Then let that inspire you and take it outside the con. Give to your time or money to something that you care deeply about. Stop getting in fights on social media and spread love and inclusion where you can.

 Just some thoughts from dadwatchesanime…

 Some of people I saw at Anime Milwaukee.

Oh yeah, I met Vic Minogna. That was cool. I got a FMA Brotherhood scroll signed for the boys.

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Until next time: Happy Viewing!

It’s Convention Time!

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It’s that time of year again for me and the boys.

Anime Milwaukee is the first con of the year for us. I’ll be taking my two boys, their cousin, and my older son’s best friend. Myself and 4 teens in one room (*shudder*), pray for me.

Anime Milwaukee is the largest Anime Con in Wisconsin. Attracting 9000+ attendees. It is held at The Hyatt Regency and Wisconsin Center, February 17-19.

It usually is a pretty fun time and has a fair amount good guests.

This year the line up includes the following voice actors:

  

VIC MIGNOGNA        IAN SINCLAIR

  

LAURA BAILEY       MAX MITTELMAN

  

LAURA POST            ZACH AGUILAR

  

ERICA MENDEZ     ERICA LINDBECK

Among several others.

There are other fashion, artists, and cosplay guests as well.

Also con favorites:

SAMURAI DAN AND JILLIAN

Who are an absolute blast to see. If you get a chance, go to one of their panels.

It should be a fun time.

Pictures in a couple of weeks!

 

“Manny Tomoe” Will Debut At ACEN

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There is something wrong with me… I accept and know this.

I got this idea last year that it would be really funny if I cosplayed as a magical girl, but didn’t even try to pass as female.

So who did I choose as my cosplay? Mami Tomoe!

Now, don’t get me wrong. This is no instance of disrespect. I love Puella Magi Madoka Magica. It is one of my favorites.

So much to both of my son’s horror and my delight, I went through with it. I have the whole outfit now and I will be wearing it next week in Chicago at Anime Central for the first time.

There are a lot of people who have been wanting to see this so, not knowing if I’ll remember to take pictures of myself while I’m at ACEN, I took a few today.

So Enjoy! and if you’re at ACEN, say “hi”.

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Anime Milwaukee 2016: Recap

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It was a weekend of teens, panels, and lines.

Anime Milwaukee 2016 was a fun time for me this year. This convention has grown over the last several years and this year topped over 9000 (yes I know) attendees.

Highlights for us (my younger son and I) this year was the Sgt Frog panel with Brina Palencia and Todd Haberkorn (and later Cherami Leigh). Winning some Blue-rays in a Sentai Filmworks industry panel. A Funimation panel. The dub release and showing of 4 episodes of Monthly Girls Nozaki-kun. And my son finally getting Kerero (Todd Haberkorn) to sign his Kululu cosplay head piece.

Downsides: Lines…

The time taken to get Todd’s autograph: 2 1/2 hours. We also did get to meet Lauren Landa (voice of Sayaka in Puella Magi Madoka Magica) which was cool for me, being the Madoka fan that I am.

We also tried, and failed, to get Christopher Sabat’s autograph for my son (Chris voices Giroro on Sgt. Frog). We waited for 2 hours in line on Sunday and the line was cut and we were turned away.

I know this is a risk at conventions while trying to get autographs, and it is why I am personally kind of against it, but my son really wants to get as many Sgt. Frog characters as he can so I indulge that for him.

The Sgt Frog panel was probably the best experience of the convention for us both. The guests were very funny. They really all seem to be fans of Sgt. Frog as a show and I have always heard good impressions for those who worked on it. The bonus was my son raising his hand at the “wrong” time and as a result was being picked on (in a silly way) by Todd. It was hilarious, my son was in heaven and couldn’t stop laughing.

I didn’t get a ton of pictures, but I will share with you some of the many talented cosplayers we came across.

Well, Crap… My Son Got a Dakimakura

As previously noted in my blog post, Why I Haven’t Got My Older Son a Dakimakura, I had avoided getting him his own sexy, anime, body pillow.

There’s a thing about teens…you can’t leave them to their own devices.

But at Anime Milwaukee I did just that.

I set him loose with his best friend and his cousin and gave him some money while I went to enjoy the convention with his little brother (who is not old enough yet to wander by himself).

I come back to the room for a break and a snack at some later point in the day and what do I find?

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I was speechless.

I wasn’t mad, or annoyed, or anything. I was somewhere between amused, slightly disturbed, and wondering what his mother was going to think when I dropped them off after the convention (she thought it was gross).

He was not in the room. His best friend was however. She laughed her butt off and texted him my reaction much to her glee.

So the moral of the story is: Teens are not to be left to their own devices with money, if they are: they might end up with a dakimakura.

Live and learn.

Now he wants another one…

Anime Milwaukee 2016

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It’s that time again: Convention time.

Myself, my two boys, their cousin, and my older son’s best friend are all packing into the car and headed out for the 3 day convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin next weekend.

Anime Milwaukee is in it’s 9th year and this will be our 4th time going (at least for my boys and I).
Guest highlights this year:

Todd Haberkorn

 Todd Haberkorn

A prolific voice actor know for many roles such as: Natsu from Fairy Tail, Italy from Hetalia, Ling Yao from Full Metal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Cheren from Pokemon, Allen Walker from D. Gray Man, Hikaru Hitachin from Ouran High School Host Club, Death The Kid from Soul Eater, as well as my younger son’s favorite Kerero from Sgt. Frog.

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 Brina Palencia

Another voice actor with a Sgt Frog credit (Tamama) along with some of the other following roles: Touka in Tokyo Ghoul, Chibitalia in Hetalia, Ciel Phantomhive in Black Butler, Holo in Spice and Wolf, Yumi Azusa in Soul Eater, Rei Ayanami in Evangelion 1.0 and 2.0, Chiaotzu and Puar in Dragon Ball Kai, Tony Tony Chopper in One Piece, and Georgie in Shin Chan.

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Chris Sabat

The final member of Sgt. Frog’s armpit platoon, Giroro, Chis has a great number of other voicing acting credits such as: Alex Luis Armstrong in Fullmetal Alchemist, Roronoa Zoro in One Piece, Ayame Sohma in Fruits Basket, Shio Sakaki in Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple, Yugo “Braun” Tennouji, as well as numerous voices on Dragonball Z.

 

All of these people are talented voice actors, but also as producers, writers, and directors. There are more guests (Sonny Strait Cherami Leigh, Kyle Herbert, Lauran Landa as well as other non-acting guests), but these are a focus. Why? Because of my younger son’s desire to get as many autographs on the head piece of his Kululu cosplay as possible.

Him with Chuck Huber (Kululu) last year at Anime Midwest.

Another fun guest pair is:

Dan

Samurai Dan and  Jillian

A comic duo, writer, and martial artist: they are a lot of fun to see. If you see them listed as guests at a con you are attending do yourself a favor and attend one of their panels. They are a lot of fun.

I will update my adventures (with pictures) after the convention.

Until then,

Happy viewing!

-the images on this post are not owned by this blog-

 

Future Cosplay Plans

As anyone whose read my little blog knows that I attend Anime conventions with my two boys. Again, this year, we will be attending several. We will be going to Anime Milwaukee, Anime Central, and Anime Midwest.

I have cosplayed in the past and last year got a devious idea. I thought: “What might be fun to cosplay, be funny, from a show I like, and embarrass my children at the same time?”

And then it came to me:

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Mami Tomoe! 

I could be a magical girl! Even better, I’m not going to shave my beard! Even better than that, I could let my beard get all burly! Even better than that with ice cream on top, I could walk around with a cigar in my mouth and call myself ‘Manny Tomoe’.

My children are horrified. I am delighted. The cosplay is on order.

Pictures to come later this year.

I’m such a bad dad….

Cosplay With Kindness Documentary

Cosplay: Literally “Costume Play.” Dressing up and pretending to be a fictional character (usually a sci-fi, comic book, or anime character).

Cosplay is often a fun way to express your fandom. It helps show others what you like, escape into a character, and bond with other fans be it characters from sci-fi, comic books, or anime.

I have cosplayed. My sons have as well. I have done Kensei Ma from Kenichi The Mightiest Disciple and Yuugo Tennouji , aka “Mr Braun” (Steins Gate). My son has done Kululu from Sgt. Frog.

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It’s fun. And I have had nothing but good experiences, as has my son. In fact, earlier this year at Anime Milwaukee, my son got invited to participate in the Masquerade (Cosplay competition) where everyone was very welcoming and supportive to him.

This, however, is not everyone’s experience.

I became aware that bullying was a thing in the cosplay community last year at Anime Midwest while attending voice actor, Greg Ayres’s panel: “Why Your Fandom Sucks”. He told a few horror stories where some fans take things too far and ruin the experience for others. It was through Greg Ayres’s Facebook page that I became aware of the documentary: “Cosplay With Kindness”.

The film maker was inspired to do this documentary after attending Greg Ayre’s “It Gets Better” panel at Anime-Zap. It is to address, and hopefully combat, bullying in the cosplay and convention going community.

Please support this project if you are able.

Go like their Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/CosplayWithKindness

Or help support their gofundme:
http://www.gofundme.com/CosplayDocumentary

And please visit their website to learn more:

http://cosplaywithkindness.org/

Cosplay and conventions should be fun. I remember when I saw the “Why Your Fandom Sucks” panel Greg saying (and I paraphrase): “There is no wrong way to cosplay. If you are not the same size, race, or gender as the character that you are cosplaying as: Who cares? You are being a fan. If your outfit is not professionally perfect: It doesn’t matter. You are being a fan and sharing your love of something with others.”

That struck a chord with me. As a  parent, and as a bit of an outcast myself, I appreciated this message. Support this project.

And more than anything else: Be kind!

-As a side note. It was my experience at Anime Midwest and seeing the Greg Ayres panel in 2014 that inspired me to start this blog.